Posts tagged "G-SIFIs"
Sheila Bair: In resisting stronger capital rules, German bank regulators used “tactics reminiscent of those used by segregationists” opposed to civil rights in the U.S.

Sheila Bair: In resisting stronger capital rules, German bank regulators used “tactics reminiscent of those used by segregationists” opposed to civil rights in the U.S.

  “Our most important relationship is with our regulator—guess where I was this afternoon?” — Anshu Jain, quoted in The Economist, 1/24/13 In a previous post, we commented on Federal Reserve Governor Dan Tarullo’s understated view that the “likelihood that some home-country governments of significant international firms will backstop their banks’ foreign operations in a crisis appears to have diminished.” {read more}
Asset Management Sale Won’t Solve Capital Concerns

Asset Management Sale Won’t Solve Capital Concerns

As regular readers of our page well know, Deutsche Bank faces a serious capital shortfall. Let’s review just a few of the reasons: In order to meet European Banking Authority requirements, Deutsche will have to raise over €3.2bn by June. In order to fulfill Basel III SiFi requirements, Deutsche will need to raise more than €12bn by 2016. {read more}
What Do You Want to Know About Deutsche Bank?

What Do You Want to Know About Deutsche Bank?

We here at Deutshce Bank Risk Alert hope to provide continuous coverage of Deutsche Bank’s risk profile in the U.S. We’ve found that many people have found their way to our site through various Deutsche-related searches. Here’s a sampling of some recent searches that landed people here: established reserves that are not material and that Deutsche Bank believes to be adequate deutsche bank leverage ratio deutsche robosigning {read more}
Can Deutsche Afford the Basel G-SIB Capital Surcharge By 2013?

Can Deutsche Afford the Basel G-SIB Capital Surcharge By 2013?

On June 25, the oversight body of the Basel Committee proposed new capital regulations that will require all of the “Globally Systemically Important Banks” (“G-SIBs”) to hold 1%-2.5% in capital above standard requirements. The G-SIBs must meet this new requirement by 2016/2018. While the Basel Committee has only issued a consultative document on how to identify G-SIBs, there should be no question that, as one of the world’s 50 largest banks, as measured by total assets, Deutsche Bank will almost certainly be included on the eventual list of G-SIBs and will be subject to the higher capital or “additional loss absorbency” requirements. {read more}