Posts tagged "Federal Reserve"
Why do EU TTIP negotiators want to weaken bank regulations designed to protect taxpayers after the financial crisis?

Why do EU TTIP negotiators want to weaken bank regulations designed to protect taxpayers after the financial crisis?

TTIP talks took place in Brusseks last month, where Eurobanks aim to undermine proposed regulations for foreign banks by the Federal Reserve.  We want to know, what is Deutsche Bank– and Germany– doing behind closed doors? What will the EU trade to help get financial services included in TTIP?   The new Federal Reserve rule finalized in January 2014 will require Deutsche Bank, like all other too-big-to-fail banks operating in the US, to maintain minimum capital and liquidity as a backstop against taxpayer losses in the event of another financial crisis. But the Association of German Banks has lobbied against this rule and is pushing for a clause in the TTIP that would allow banks like Deutsche Bank to weaken its effect.  Why would European negotiators push for a process that would weaken bank solvency rules designed to protect all of us?  Conservative economist Simon Johnson wrote a piece on the lack of... {read more}
UNITE HERE Urges the Deutsche Bank Championship to ensure foreign players play by the same rules as U.S. players

UNITE HERE Urges the Deutsche Bank Championship to ensure foreign players play by the same rules as U.S. players

  Washington, D.C. – On the eve of the Deutsche Bank Championship, a PGA Tour Playoff event held at TPC Boston in Norton, Mass., UNITE HERE calls for tournament officials to ensure that foreign players play by the same rules and are held to the same standards as U.S. players. “We all believe in fair play and a level playing field,” said UNITE HERE spokesperson Marty Leary. “Therefore, foreign players should be required to compete at the Deutsche Bank Championship under the same rules as American players. For example, foreign golfers should be given no more mulligans than American golfers. In fact, no player should be handed any mulligans and get bailed out from their own bad decisions and poor play.” {read more}
Prospective Clients: Will Deutsche Bank’s US Operations Remain Stable?

Prospective Clients: Will Deutsche Bank’s US Operations Remain Stable?

In addition to the legal and headline risks, Deutsche Bank has been facing intense criticism from U.S. regulators for capital concerns, culminating in a new rule proposed by the Fed in December 2012 to regulate foreign banks’ U.S. subsidiaries (known as the “Anti-Deutsche Bank Rule” on Wall Street).  One of the reasons for the new rule is to prevent another large-scale financial crisis that would force the Federal Reserve to provide billions of dollars in emergency funding to foreign banks operating in the U.S. Recently the head of the FDIC called the bank, “horribly undercapitalized.”  {read more}
Proposed Rule for Foreign Banks is Response to German Bank’s Negative Capital in U.S.

Proposed Rule for Foreign Banks is Response to German Bank’s Negative Capital in U.S.

Comments supporting the Federal Reserve’s proposed rule for foreign banks were submitted today by UNITE HERE.  The largest of the foreign banks affected by this Proposed Rule is Deutsche Bank AG.  “We believe the German lender’s longstanding capital and liquidity issues pose a real risk to the global financial system, and that the Proposed Rule would significantly mitigate that risk while restoring competitive equality between foreign banks and domestic competitors,” said Marty Leary and Meredith Schafer in the letter to the Federal Reserve. The complete comment on the Proposed Rule can be read here. In addition, thousands of people from Hawaii to Boston have written to the Federal Reserve supporting the proposed rule and highlighting Deutsche Bank’s too-big-to-fail status. German regulators in particular have helped create the conditions necessitating enhanced prudential standards in the U.S. through resistance to higher capital and liquidity standards in the Basel discussions.  Deutsche Bank’s U.S. subsidiary... {read more}